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About History Of Gates

The city is a tourism hub, surrounded by many historical monuments, including the Ajanta Caves and Ellora Caves, which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites, as well as Bibi Ka Maqbara and Panchakki. Aurangabad is sometimes referred to as Khujista Bunyad by the Chroniclers of Aurangzeb's reign. Aurangabad was a part of the Princely State of Hyderabad during the British Raj, until its annexation into the Indian Union after the Indian

One of the things that made Aurangabad stand out from several other medieval cities in India was its 52 "gates", each of which had a local history or had individuals linked with it. Aurangabad is known as the "City of Gates". Out of the 52, only four main and nine subordinate gates have survived, the most famous, oldest and biggest of them being the Bhadkal Gate near the Naukhanda Palace.

Bhadkal Gate: This gate is the biggest gate of city. It was built by Ahmadnagar's, Murtaza Nizamshah's Vazir Malik Ambar. It was built in memory of victory against Mughals in 1612. It is also known as victory gate. Bhadkal Gate has unique architectural style. It is India's first column structural Building. Delhi Gate: The largest and the most stately, it was built by Aurangzeb. It is situated to the north of the city facing Delhi. It is similar to Lahore gate of Delhi's Lal Quila (Red Fort).

Paithan Gate: The gate is smaller in size and was royal gateway leading to Paithan town. This gate is smaller in size compared to other gates. Mecca or Makai Gate: This gate leads to Begumpura another walled quarter of the city, and is the only gate that has a canon installed on it. It faces the holy city of Mecca towards the west.

Naubat Darwaza: This gate leads to the palace fort of Qila–e-Ark. The palace had its own fortification walls and had five gates other than this gate. Rest of the five gates are in ruins.

Roshan Gate: This gate is located to the north of the city. It is bigger in size and stature. Roshan gate is said to have been named after Aurangezeb's sister Roshanara to whom the emperor was much attached and she remained his favorite friend and advisor.

Rangeen Darwaza : is one of the ancient gates of Aurangabad city, at present near the residence of district collector on Qila–e-Ark. Qila–e-Ark used to be the residence of the last Mughal emperor Aurangzeb during his stay in Aurangabad from 1680 to 1707. The gate was one of the main entrances to the Aurangzeb's palace. The gate was recently restored by Aurangabad Municipal Corporation.


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